6 Quick Tips For Your Business Presentations

Practices that help people design presentations and the practices that help them deliver successfully do not overlap much. A systematic approach helps busy executives discover how to win results faster.

Thomas Sechehaye has determined two distinct sets of behaviors and practices necessary for effective design and delivery.

Practices associated with successful design only were:
• Participate in audience research
• Look for new information about design
• Learn story structures
• Design for visual impact
• Plan specific calls to action
• Structure dramatic flow
• Follow brand or company guidelines
• Adapt to diverse media

Practices associated with successful delivery only were:
• Adapt to specific audience insights
• Refine vocal quality and tone
• Practice effective eye contact
• Use authentic personal strengths
• Build high impact body language skills
• Share personal experiences with anecdotes
• Get 1:1 coaching and feedback
• Rehearse for face-to-face and virtual delivery

As the two stages demand and require different practices, then executive and sales presentation training needs to guide people about key strategies for each phase. While many organizations target presentation skills training, these two phases are often merged. The skills are rarely broken out as discretely different.

Some people are extremely anxious about delivery skills. All they can think about is previous experiences of feeling anxious, losing their voice, or feeling queasy. Successful delivery skills help professionals reinvent the experience of presenting.

But many of the challenges of delivery can be solved with careful attention to design.”

Professionals who want dramatic improvement in presentation results should emphasize 6 key best practices, listed here.

Key Practice 1. Identify Design Process
Define how presentations are built from the ground up. Find out if every individual or team is doing this differently, or following a proven and systematic design process.

Key Practice 2. Share Best Practices
Once you have determined the best practices for your business, share them. Remove inter-departmental barriers by sharing best practices. This may be done informally amongst peers; or more formally in design debriefs.

Key Practice 3. Storyboard Presentations
You would never build a house by just grabbing a 2 x 4 lying on the ground. Yet many business presentations are built in such a haphazard manner. Use a storyboard to plan powerful presentations from start to finish. This is critical to increase productivity-and streamline processes across your business.

Key Practice 4. Learn Skills For Design & Delivery
Begin with the end in mind. Learn the skills for design and delivery success. Approach each area as a unique skill set. Solid design sets the foundation for high-impact delivery. Therefore, learning design skills first is a smart approach.

Key Practice 5. Provide Training Options For Individuals
Different people learn in different ways. Some people prefer the freedom of online learning. Others learn best in a classroom environment, with shoulder-to-shoulder instruction.

In an ideal environment, provide options that encourage individual freedom of choice. If travel budgets are tight, provide online training that offers freedom in instructional design. This recreates a friendly, open environment for learning new skills.

Key Practice 6. Strengthen Skills With Coaching
One on one coaching is one of the best ways to create rapid improvement. With new advances in virtual coaching, this is now much more available and affordable than in the past.

With a step-by-step approach to the unique skills of presentation design and delivery, busy professionals can make rapid progress and not leave up to chance.

Everything in Life is Negotiable

My best guess is that you and most people you know are uncomfortable with “formal” negotiations for several reasons. First, you do not believe that negotiating is a natural event. Formal negotiations tend to be viewed from the perspective that the only possible outcome from a negotiation is that one party “wins” and the other party “loses”.

What appears to be so ominous to many people is something they probably do not realize is part of their everyday life. In fact, all of us are involved in negotiations of one sort or another throughout the day and the night at work and at home. At work, you are negotiating with other employees, with your bosses, with other departments, with customers, etc. At home, you are negotiating with other members of the family. Some people even negotiate with their pets.

Look around and observe what’s going on around you during the course of the day. You’ll soon realize that negotiating is taking place everywhere, and that it is an integral part of everyday life.

My approach to negotiating is based on two premises:
1. Everything in life is negotiable
2. If you don’t ask, you won’t get.

Think about how often you’ve walked into a store, picked out an item, gone to the checkout counter and paid the price shown on the ticket. Not every time, but in many cases, you’ve left something on the table. Had you negotiated, you really could have done better. Just because there is a price tag on an item does not mean that you have to accept it. You’re probably shaking your head right about now and saying “Yeah right” I’ll just walk into a store and tell the sales person that their price is too high and I want a better price.

Before you laugh too hard, next time you go into a store, keep the following points in mind:
o You are the customer
o The sales person wants to make a sale
o Your money will spend anywhere
o There are competitors’ stores offering the same merchandise
o You need to be convinced as to why you should purchase the item from the store you’re in as opposed to somewhere else.

If the salesperson and possibly the store manager do not understand the situation from your perspective, they need to be made aware of your thought process in a gentle way. In other words, you need to try and get them to understand that if they do not in some way satisfy you, you probably will take your money somewhere else to get a better deal. You really do not have to hit them over the head with a hammer to get them to understand that you are the customer, and that the potential for making —-or losing — the sale is in their hands.

Tips to Making a Salary Negotiation Letter

When in search for a new job, you definitely want something you can enjoy and can get compensated a lot for. Having a job is a necessity to be able to survive, but if everyone had a choice, they would most likely not work at all. This is why it is important that you find a job that you like seeing as you will be spending most of your days there. If you believe you have found your dream job but aren’t getting the pay you would like, a solution is to make a salary negotiation letter. Learn these tips in how to compose one so that you can be sure that you have tried everything you can to get the best possible salary in that job.

First tip when making a salary negotiation letter is that you must indicate how happy you are to be chosen for the position and how excited you are to begin work for the company. Also discuss how your experiences and skills will be a great contribution to the company and that you are looking forward to gaining new experiences as well. Talk about your goals and how you plan to tackle certain things in your first couple of months of work.

Negotiating your salary doesn’t start until the second part of the letter. After mentioning all the things stated above, that is when you discuss how you want to counter the offer they presented to you. Based on your research and in relation to the market rate, indicate an amount that you see fit. Certainly you can’t expect to be granted that same amount so always peg it at a higher rate then what you are really expecting to ensure you still get what you want.

After indicating the salary you expect, discuss why you believe you deserve this amount. Talk about your past experiences, your skills, and how you have earned it with all your achievements. Don’t forget to mention your goals and plans for the company as well so that you can show them that you will be earning the salary you are requesting for. As long as you can justify your request, you shouldn’t encounter any problems.

For your other concerns like vacation leaves or benefits, discuss these in the remaining paragraphs. Don’t go overboard and only request for things that you absolutely need. Remember, you are just about to start the job so you shouldn’t be too demanding either. When ending your letter in the last paragraph, mention how you are excited for the job and request for a meeting to discuss this negotiation further.

Following these tips to making a salary negotiation letter is all you need to be successful. Don’t have second thoughts about negotiating, you have to remember that most companies expect negotiation to take place so don’t think you are doing anything wrong with ensuring you get the salary you are happy with.