Present Perfect

“Every negative event contains within it the seed of an equal or greater benefit.” ~ Napoleon Hill, Think and Grow Rich

Perhaps you’re familiar with present perfect as a grammatical term, but I would like to offer a different perspective of these words – as in “the present is perfect.”

Now, before you scream at me that your present is anything BUT perfect, please indulge me for a moment and consider an event from your past that you judged to be ‘bad or ‘wrong’ at the time. Now, think carefully about what transpired as a result of that experience.

What events unfolded because of it? What was the outcome? Is it possible that something ‘good’ came about? I would venture to say that it did… every time.

At first, it may be difficult at accept that there was any ‘good,’ but I guarantee that if you look hard enough and long enough, you will ALWAYS find it. Something ALWAYS happens as a result of an experience that makes it perfect.

The first personal example that comes to my mind happened a few years ago. One morning, I woke up with some discomfort in my lower back. Within a couple of hours, the discomfort had escalated to the point where I couldn’t move without excruciating pain. The only way I could get around was by dragging myself across the floor. Raising my body to sit on the toilet was almost unbearable, and sitting on a chair or couch was impossible.

Walking was also out of the question, so I ate very little that day. It was far too painful to stand up and prepare food, and I could only manage a few minutes at a time. I swallowed some pain-killers, gathered some cushions around me, and tried to make myself as comfortable as possible on the floor. With the TV remote on one side of me and the telephone on the other, I managed to get through the day.

Sleep that night was fitful to say the least, but I managed to get in a couple of hours. The next day wasn’t any better. The pain was still unbearable, so one of my daughters came over to help. She took one look at me and carted me off to the Emergency Department of the local hospital where we waited for almost ten hours to see a doctor and for them to examine me. They took x-rays, they poked, and they prodded. Their diagnosis was ‘probably’ sciatica so they gave me drugs for the pain and referred me to my family doctor who later referred me to a specialist for tests.

At first blush, there doesn’t appear to be anything positive about this experience, but let me elaborate a little about my circumstances at that time. I had returned from Thailand a few months earlier and had made the decision not to work at a traditional office job because my boredom with office work was what sent me to Thailand in the first place! But, we all have to eat and pay for a roof over our head, so I had been working for a couple of temp agencies to tide me over until I came across the “perfect” job. I hadn’t the faintest idea what that would be, but I had faith in the Universe that it would materialize.

The only problem with temp work is that there are no benefits: No sick leave, no medical insurance, no drug plan. Plus, no work = no income. How was I going to pay my rent? My savings were nonexistent since my Thailand trip and my family were in no position to help out so my financial outlook was pretty dismal. My only recourse was… dare I say it?… WELFARE.

Just the word sent shivers down my spine! I had never received ‘charity’ in my life and even disliked unemployment insurance the couple of times I had been laid off past jobs. How was I ever going to accept welfare?

To cut a long story short, Social Services treated me with dignity and respect and I have nothing but praise for their help. Sure, walking into the building was tough on my pride. (Who would see me?) What would my bank say when they recognized the source of the funds paid into my account and realized I was on welfare? (As if they had someone checking!) How would I answer friends’ inquiries about what I was doing these days? It was a very humbling experience to say the least.

So what was perfect about it, you may ask. Nothing… at the time. Enduring pain, humiliation and guilt are not my idea of positive experiences. However, there was an up side to it all. As I was unable to sit for extended periods of time and therefore unable to work in traditional jobs, Social Services directed me to a self-employment program that taught participants how to set-up their own business as well as the skills necessary to maintain it.

In the months prior to my sciatica episode, I had written my first book “Joy Makers” and had the brilliant idea of creating a business around it. I wrote up a proposal for my idea and was accepted into the self-employment program. As a result, I received impressive instruction from a wonderful business advisor/trainer who also became a personal friend. In addition to this friendship, I also benefited in other ways. Here are some of them:

* My new business advisor/friend generously invited me to participate in a private course she was teaching about creating your own life. This led to some amazing personal revelations and was a turning point in my life.
* The same person also introduced me to another wonderful friend who I would probably never have met otherwise.
* My book was eventually published.
* The experience I gained from publishing my own book, led to a meeting with another self-published author who also became a very good friend.
* This friend became my business partner in two different ventures.
* I now co-own a self-publishing service where we assist writers to become published authors, and another wellness business which provides healthier, safer products for families and the environment at very reasonable prices.
* I still maintain contact with many of the people I met on the business course and have been able to share and network with many others.
* I learned a great deal about online marketing.
* I taught myself website design to market my book and my businesses.

These are just some of the results of that event. In addition to the above, one of my daughters who had been living in Pennsylvania, was prompted by my sciatica challenge to come back, and we continue to share a home. Since I had been missing her very much, I was overjoyed at her return as we get along very well. This relationship has proved to be a godsend to us both and we continue to grow from it.

I hope this account of a ‘bad’ incident has provided you with an example of the perfection of our experiences. Certainly I didn’t look upon it as a ‘good’ thing at the time but, in retrospect, a great many good things came about because of it… both the sciatica and my ensuing welfare episode.

There have been many other incidents where I can look back on a ‘bad’ experience and recognize the blessing that transpired as a result. In retrospect, I can’t think of one single event in my life that was not positive. So now, when something “unwanted” takes place, I look at it with acceptance – the attitude that this too shall pass and I will eventually find the ‘pearl within.’

For me, this is a much better way of looking at my life situation. For me, the present is ALWAYS perfect!

Taking the Ex Factor Out of Your Present Relationship

I know for many of us it is easy to say good bye to a relationship that no longer seems to work. What I mean by easy is that even when you may not be ready to let go of the relationship you come to an understanding that you have to move on. However, although you may physically move on from the relationship, if you have not let the emotional and mental baggage go from the previous relationship you may find yourself dropping those former baggage onto your current mate’s door step.

I had an opportunity to speak with a client of mine who said some very hurtful things to her spouse during the heat of an argument. She did not realize that what she was wrong as her spouse “knew” that was how she dealt with her frustrations. Well to make a long story short I found myself asking her this question, “why do you continue to have your ex-boyfriend sleeping in the bed with your spouse and you?” She paused for a moment and did not understand my question as she was thinking physical. As I probed with her more, she began to see that she was treating her spouse the same way as she did with her former boyfriend. She was “stopping” the hurt before she was actually hurt by her husband. However, she was not stopping any hurt but creating more hurt within her marriage. How you may ask? She was treating and responding to her husband in the exact same way she did her ex-boyfriend who left her.

Without knowing it, my client was reliving her previous relationship with her ex-boyfriend through her current relationship with her husband. As the revelation became more evident to her she realized that she loved her husband and never meant to make those hurtful comments. She finally understood that as long as she kept holding on to the words and behaviors she kept bottled up inside of her from her former relationship, she might have ended up losing her marriage for a man she has no interest in being with. Have you ever found yourself in a situation where your mate may have said or did something that reminded you of your previous mate? What was your response? Did you respond to your current mate as you would with your ex or did you take the time to realize that you are in a different relationship with a different person and your actions and responses should be different?

If you are still sleeping with the ex partner within your current relationship, here are a few tips to help you obtain some closure with the former relationship:

1. Let the person “have it”- If you never had the chance to tell your ex how you felt about the relationship write a letter. You will not send the letter off but just write it so that you tell the person how you feel. Once you have gotten all of your emotions up, tear it up and flush it down the toilet.

2. Speak to your current partner- One of the challenges many people face in a relationship especially new ones is letting your mate know what happened to you in the past. If you are in a committed relationship where you feel like the two of you may be in it for the long haul, let your mate know what words and actions annoy you. If you do not tell your mate then how will they know that this is an area of contention for you.

3. Don’t throw yourself under the bus- Don’t beat yourself up if you get into a squabble with your current partner and you find yourself reverting back to your old ways. When you find yourself saying or doing something you may have done with your ex, take a pause for the cause and excuse yourself from the situation. Explain to your mate that you need to leave for a moment so that you will not say or do something that will cause harm to your present relationship. Designate a meeting place and time to share your thoughts with your mate in a non-argumentative manner.

4. Stay committed to your mate- If you believe this is your soul mate and you want to make the relationship work, stay committed to one another through talking and sharing your feelings. Don’t wait until an argument to arrive to complain or air everything out. Most arguments are solved when they are handle as disagreements in the here and now. It is when you hold on to past hurts that may break down the line of communication with your mate. Let old habits be buried so that new habits may spring life into your present relationship.

All in all, in some form or fashion we have all been hurt by an ex-girlfriend or ex-boyfriend that may continue to foster pain within our lives. However, if you choose daily to let those hurts go you will find yourself dwelling less on them. The less hurts you allow to control your thoughts in your present relationship, the more fulfillment and enjoyment you will feel with the mate you are with. So go ahead and kick that ex factor out of your present relationship as your mate and you will benefit from not having the third wheel in your lives.

April Lisbon-Peoples is a growth and development coach who enjoys inspiring her clients to find their life’s purpose through becoming visionaries. She the founder and CEO of Running Your Race, a coaching practice designed for individuals who are ready to awaken their visions and create their destiny.

What Are The Risks For Employees Exposed To High Levels Of Noise?

onsite audiometric testing on their staff to ensure that they are not suffering form any hearing difficulties caused by loud sounds in their work environment.

What is noise and how can it affect your health

Noise exposure can be defined as the amount of sound that an individual is exposed to over a period of time. It can be caused by a variety of things, including machines, vehicles, and even people. When loud sounds are present in the workplace, it can cause a number of health problems for employees, including hearing loss, tinnitus, and stress.

It is important for employers to understand the risks associated with noise exposure and take steps to reduce these risks. Employees who are exposed to high levels of sound should be provided with proper safety gear, such as earplugs or earmuffs. In addition, employers should create a safe work environment where employees are not constantly exposed to loud noises by hiring professionals to carry out regular noise monitoring services. By taking these simple steps, employers can help protect their employees from the harmful effects of being exposed to high levels of sound.

In addition to the risks mentioned above, employees who are exposed to high levels of noise can also experience stress and anxiety. This is because loud sounds can be extremely distracting and make it difficult for employees to concentrate on their work. In some cases, this can lead to mistakes being made or even accidents happening in the workplace.

Employers should take steps to reduce the amount of noise that their employees are exposed to in order to protect them from the risks associated with such exposure. It is important for employers to create a safe work environment where employees are not constantly exposed to loud noises which can cause health problems.

One way to reduce such hazards in the workplace is by using soundproofing materials. There are a number of different types of soundproofing materials that can be used for this purpose, including acoustic foam and rubberized floor mats. These materials can help to absorb some of the sound that is produced in an office environment and prevent it from travelling throughout the room or building where employees are working. This will ensure that any loud noises which may occur during normal business hours do not pose a threat to employee safety or affect their ability to focus on their work tasks effectively.

The risks for employees exposed to high levels of noise

The risks for employees who are exposed to loud noises include:

Hearing loss: This is the most common risk for employees who are exposed to high levels of sound in the workplace. Prolonged exposure to loud environments can cause permanent hearing damage, which can lead to a decrease in overall quality of life.
Tinnitus: This is a condition that causes ringing or buzzing in the ears. It can be extremely disruptive and may require treatment from a medical professional.
Stress and fatigue: Such extreme exposure can also cause stress and fatigue, both of which can have a negative impact on employee productivity and safety.

Some of these conditions can be prevented by taking steps to reduce the risks of exposure in your workplace. For example, you can use ear protection such as earplugs or muffs when working around loud equipment or machinery; this will help minimize how much sound enters into your ears. You could also invest in noise-cancelling headphones if you have an office job and need some peace from outside distractions like busy street sounds etc.

Best practices for reducing risk:

Use hearing protection equipment (ear plugs/mufflers) when operating noisy machinery so it doesn’t enter into one’s personal space too easily. This prevents employees from being exposed over long periods without any breaks, which could lead to permanent damage.
Reduce overall levels of sound in the workplace by properly maintaining equipment and using sound-absorbing materials in the building’s design.
Encourage employees to take regular breaks away from such exposure, even if they are wearing hearing protection. This gives your ears a chance to rest and reduces the risk of developing long-term hearing problems.

How to protect yourself from noise-related health risks

If you are an employee who is working in a loud environment, you should know what you can do to protect yourself from developing noise-related health problems.

Here are a few tips:

Wear hearing protection whenever you are exposed to loud environments. This will help protect your ears from damage.
Try to limit the amount of time you spend in a noisy area, and take regular breaks away from it.
Keep your head tilted down when listening to music or other audio devices, as this will help keep the sound pressure off your eardrums.
If possible, avoid working in loud environments altogether. If this is not possible, try to find ways to reduce the sound level in your work area. For example, use earplugs or headphones with active noise cancellation technology.

What to do if you experience hearing loss or tinnitus as a result of working in a noisy environment

Regular audiometric testing is important for these employees who are constantly being exposed to high levels of sound. Such tests can be carried out by an audiologist, and they will be able to tell you if there has been any damage to your hearing.

If you experience any form of hearing loss or tinnitus as a result of working in a noisy environment, it is important to see your doctor as soon as possible. They will be able to provide you with the necessary treatment and advice. Some employees may also be entitled to claim compensation for their hearing loss or tinnitus.

The risks for employees exposed to high levels of noise are real and can cause permanent damage if not managed correctly. By following these best practices, employers can reduce the amount of noise exposure their staff is subjected to on a daily basis. And remember, always wear hearing protection when working with loud machinery.