Internet Authors Live In The Present

Internet Authors are living in the present? They have to. In fact, any author needs to think about what’s happening now, right now, this minute. Whether it’s thinking about how to finish a chapter, or whether their character suddenly became unbelievable, or how the dialogue sounds. When they’re hunched over their new creation, they need to be there, really be there, in the here and now.

Traditional Publishers, on the other hand, are lurking somewhere in the 1950s, most of them. Some are still back in the ’30s of course, and you can usually tell them by the way they dress and the elaborate and affected manner in which they speak. The majority, however, are there in the days before computers and Elvis Presley. They tend to like large desks, they fill them with parcels and piles of paper, and imagine themselves deciding the future of ‘culture’ in the Western world, with their exquisite taste and rare educated sensibility. Quite specifically, that places them before the advent of mass television and before electronic means of creating text. It also makes them insensible to the growth of the internet, a medium which has made the purchase and dissemination of the written word at once far easier and also less discriminating in its choice of material. The internet allows anyone with a story to reach a readership. Publishers are no longer the Gatekeepers, the people who have the luxury of deciding what the public has the opportunity to read. The readers, those most underestimated people, are now able to make such decisions for themselves.

Which is odd. A canvas of local creative people that I know came back with the assumption that writers live ‘in the future’. The paradox is caused by an assumption that authors are always thinking ahead, whether it’s planning the finale of a novel, or trying to decide which of their many ideas should they bring to life next. Also, once the work is finished, there’s the hard work of selecting a suitable agent or publisher to parcel off the paper and send it to. Then there’s the imagining of what the reaction might be, anticipating the best outcome, and planning how to spend the new-found wealth (really). That’s all fine, and true to a certain extent, but I’d argue that such planning (and predicting) is still based on a keen appreciation of what’s happening now. If the novel is finished, then sure, it starts to hunt for an audience. But that means living in the ‘now’, seeing the book ready and willing to go. If the creator was really addicted to the world to come, then they’d be living there, happy and contented with their dream of success, fame and riches. The book, on the other hand, would never get as far as the Post Office.

There’s another reason that authors to live in the present, and that is that the past is usually a painful and disappointing place to be. That’s certainly true at one level, judging by the vast output of recent books in the ‘Troubled Childhood’ category. There’s plenty of people out there, it seems, who have had traumatic and harrowing younger years. But I was thinking of the more recent past. For most authors, (and that means the 99% who aren’t basking in the affluence of a six figure publishing deal), that consists of trial and effort. Mostly, in fact, failing. Because, strange as it seems considering the humiliation and degradation involved, most would-be writers still feel compelled to go down the route of seeking publication by the ‘tried and trusted’ method of dispatching their hard-wrought efforts out to a publisher’s office. Inevitably, given the immense odds stacked against them, the likelihood is that the parcel is returned, (sometimes unopened, usually unread). That means disappointment, sorrow, dejection. Who’d want to wallow in such bad feelings? Far better, as any self-help guru will advise you, to ‘pick yourself up’, forget the bad experience, and move on. And that journey – moving on from the past – brings you not to the future, but to the present.

In other words, if you want to survive in the creative industries, get used to the idea that yesterday is where you failed and felt bad. Today is where you have to get on with it, finish the next story and post off the last one (maybe for the second, third or fourth time), and tomorrow is where you start a new work and – maybe, if you’re very, incredibly lucky – you will get recognition for all the good stuff you’re doing now. Maybe. That’s one way. One method. There’s another. And that is – forget ‘tradition’ and explore the internet. There you will find companies that will publish your work on a ‘print on demand’ basis and won’t charge you upfront fees. You’ll get published. You’ll see your work in book form and be able to distribute it to your friends. And there’s no grinding, humiliating put-downs involved. It’s here. It’s now. It’s technically hard to believe, but it’s come about and it’s happened. It’s what those of us in the know call ‘the present’.

Everything in Life is Negotiable

My best guess is that you and most people you know are uncomfortable with “formal” negotiations for several reasons. First, you do not believe that negotiating is a natural event. Formal negotiations tend to be viewed from the perspective that the only possible outcome from a negotiation is that one party “wins” and the other party “loses”.

What appears to be so ominous to many people is something they probably do not realize is part of their everyday life. In fact, all of us are involved in negotiations of one sort or another throughout the day and the night at work and at home. At work, you are negotiating with other employees, with your bosses, with other departments, with customers, etc. At home, you are negotiating with other members of the family. Some people even negotiate with their pets.

Look around and observe what’s going on around you during the course of the day. You’ll soon realize that negotiating is taking place everywhere, and that it is an integral part of everyday life.

My approach to negotiating is based on two premises:
1. Everything in life is negotiable
2. If you don’t ask, you won’t get.

Think about how often you’ve walked into a store, picked out an item, gone to the checkout counter and paid the price shown on the ticket. Not every time, but in many cases, you’ve left something on the table. Had you negotiated, you really could have done better. Just because there is a price tag on an item does not mean that you have to accept it. You’re probably shaking your head right about now and saying “Yeah right” I’ll just walk into a store and tell the sales person that their price is too high and I want a better price.

Before you laugh too hard, next time you go into a store, keep the following points in mind:
o You are the customer
o The sales person wants to make a sale
o Your money will spend anywhere
o There are competitors’ stores offering the same merchandise
o You need to be convinced as to why you should purchase the item from the store you’re in as opposed to somewhere else.

If the salesperson and possibly the store manager do not understand the situation from your perspective, they need to be made aware of your thought process in a gentle way. In other words, you need to try and get them to understand that if they do not in some way satisfy you, you probably will take your money somewhere else to get a better deal. You really do not have to hit them over the head with a hammer to get them to understand that you are the customer, and that the potential for making —-or losing — the sale is in their hands.

What Should Be Included In A Health And Safety Policy For The Workplace?

these with a follow up WHS consultation with a professional body, occupational hygienist in Australia or consultant.

The components of a health and safety policy include the following.

General safety guidelines

One component of a health and safety policy includes a general safety guideline such as:

Wearing the appropriate safety gear – Explaining what kind of safety gear should be worn and why it must be worn.
Procedures to follow in case of an accident – Explain what employees should do if someone is injured or ill at work, for example, where to find the first aid kit and who to call.
Rules regarding smoking in the workplace – Should you allow smoking inside your building? If so, explain where people can smoke and when they cannot smoke.
Procedures on how handle hazardous materials – Explain what kind of hazardous materials are used by your business and how these should be handled. For example: “All chemical spills must immediately be cleaned up.” Or “All chemical spills must immediately be reported”.

Other general safety guidelines may include rules on lifting heavy objects; conducting of WHS audits; the use of personal protective equipment (PPE), such as safety glasses and gloves; providing staff training on how to safely operate machinery, and emergency procedures.

First aid and emergency procedures

Emergency first aid procedures are an important aspect of any safety program. First aid procedures must be in place to assist employees and visitors during any unforeseen incident or accident that may occur on the premises of your business. This can include administering CPR, dealing with burns or broken bones, as well as responding to other medical emergencies such as choking and poisoning. Staff must also know where the first aid kit is located at all times (e.g., next to the kitchen sink).

If you have a large staff team then it is recommended that someone is appointed specifically for this role, so they are trained in basic first aid techniques like how perform CPR.

The Australian Red Cross offers training courses for people who want learn more about how to provide first aid treatment to others. The course covers topics such as:

Managing an emergency until professional help arrives.
Acting safely, effectively and calmly in an emergency situation.
Assessing the situation quickly.
Recognising emergencies, including cardiac arrest and stroke.
Providing first aid for wounds, bleeding and shock; poisoning; burns; choking (adult); bone, muscle and joint injuries.

There are also a range of free resources available on the Red Cross website about health and safety issues that can be downloaded and referenced by staff. These provide information about how to prevent common workplace accidents from occurring as well as other relevant topics such as preventing slips, trips and falls. They also provide details on what to do if someone is injured or becomes unwell while they are at work, so it is a good idea keep copies of these materials in the workplace.

Fire safety precautions

Fires are a common occurrence in the workplace, with around 15,000 reported each year. In most cases, these fires can be avoided by taking some simple precautions.

The first step is to have a fire evacuation plan in place and ensure all employees are familiar with it. Employees should also be aware of the location of the nearest fire exit and how to use it.

In addition to having a fire evacuation plan, businesses should also have an emergency action plan. This plan should include details on what to do if a fire occurs, such as evacuating the building and calling emergency services.

It is important to have adequate fire safety equipment in the workplace, including smoke detectors, extinguishers, and hoses. All of this equipment should be checked regularly to ensure that it is in working order.

Employers should also ensure that the workplace is a safe and healthy place to work. This includes providing adequate training on health and safety, as well as enforcing safe work practices. Employees should be aware of the risks associated with their job and how to minimise these risks.

Health and hygiene policies

Health and hygiene are another important aspect of health and safety in the workplace. Employers must ensure that they provide their employees with a safe working environment, which includes providing adequate toilet facilities and handwashing facilities.

Employees should be encouraged to wash their hands regularly throughout the day and to use soap when doing so. Employees who work in areas such as kitchens or food preparation areas should also be discouraged from putting fingers into their mouths or touching contaminated surfaces without first washing them thoroughly.

If an employer is unable to provide these basic hygiene requirements for its workers, then it may find itself facing legal action from those who are taken ill by poor conditions at work. If you want your business to succeed then make sure that your staff have access to clean toilets, sinks, hand basins and maintain other basic sanitary needs.

Food and drink in the workplace

Food and drinks play an important role in the workplace. Not only do they provide energy and sustenance to help workers power on through their day, but they can also be used as a way to celebrate success or boost morale. However, it is important to remember that while food and drinks can be enjoyed in moderation, they can also pose a health and safety risk if not handled correctly.

For example, employers should ensure that employees do not drink alcohol or eat food that may have been contaminated while working. In addition, workers should be discouraged from eating or drinking in areas such as kitchens or food preparation areas where there is a risk of contamination. This is because consuming food or drink that has been contaminated with bacteria or viruses can lead to gastrointestinal problems such as vomiting and diarrhoea which can be very serious, especially if they occur in a workplace.

Use of technology in the workplace

All workplaces use technology and it is very important for employers to ensure that employees are aware of how they can use it safely. Employers should also explain why workers should not use their mobile phones while working as this may lead to accidents and injury, especially if they were texting or phoning while using dangerous or heavy machinery.

For example, a worker who has been using his/her phone while on duty could inadvertently cause harm to themselves or others because he/she was distracted by something else such as reading messages from friends or family members with whom they have contact through social media sites like Facebook Twitter and so forth. They must be trained in safe work practices when working near machinery and equipment in order for them not only to protect themselves but also any other employees that are around them.

A health and safety policy is important for a number of reasons. It helps to protect your employees from potential workplace accidents or injuries, it shows that you are taking responsibility for the health and safety of your workers, and it can help to reduce the likelihood of legal action being taken against your business in the event of an accident. Having a written health and safety policy also makes sure that all members of staff are aware of their responsibilities when it comes to workplace health and safety. This not only reduces the risk of accidents happening, but also ensures that everyone is working towards maintaining a safe workplace.